Massage – When You Should and Shouldn’t Massage Your Pet

Have you ever thought about giving your pet a massage? Just as with humans, pets can enjoy a number of great benefits from receiving a massage. At the same time, there are certain situations when a massage is not the appropriate course of action. Therefore, it is important for you to understand the benefits of massage as well as when massage is not appropriate.

Massage - When You Should and Shouldn't Massage Your Pet

Exploring the Benefits of Massage

Even if your pet is not sick or injured in some way, giving it a good massage now and again can provide it with a number of benefits. One of these is the bond it helps you form with your bellowed pet, as giving your pet a massage helps to promote socialization while giving you special one-on-one time together.

Massage is also beneficial to animals that suffer from joint problems, over-extended muscles, arthritis, and torn ligaments. Or, if you are traveling or if your pet has to remain cooped up in a small place for a period of time, giving it a massage is a good way to help alleviate stiffness and to improve flexibility.

When giving your pet a massage, it is important to keep in mind that each muscle on its body has an effect on other muscles. Therefore, by helping muscles in one area become more flexible and relaxed, you also help other muscles in the area. At the same time, if your pet becomes injured in one area, this will also affect other muscles in the body. As such, if you are giving your pet a massage in an effort to alleviate stiffness or soreness, you shouldn’t concentrate all of your efforts on the affected area. Rather, give some attention to other areas of your pet’s body as well.

When Massage is Not the Answer

Although massage provides a number of benefits, there are also times when it is not appropriate. For example, if your pet is suffering from any of the following conditions, a massage should not be conducted:

  • Fever
  • Immune Disease
  • Infection
  • Lumps
  • Open Wounds
  • Rashes
  • Shock

In general, massage therapy does not help with … Read the rest

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Managing Your Pet’s Health Records – How and Why

Keeping health records for ourselves and our loved ones is important and something that we all should do. As a pet owner, do not inadvertently overlook keeping track and documenting your four legged family member’s health information.

Do not wait until an emergency happens to get your pet’s veterinary information organized and at your fingertips. Getting organized and compiling vet records is easy. Get a binder for each pet and label it with their name. Put the binder somewhere that is convenient to access and easy to spot. Start collecting past health information from your vet. Going forward request copies of vaccinations, tests, medicines, etc.

Managing Your Pet's Health Records - How and Why

Your pet’s health binder should include the following basic information for each pet:

  • A Name, birth date, and gender.
  • A Breed and general description including color and approximate weight.
  • A A recent photograph.
  • A Microchip or tattoo information.
  • A Name of your vet, veterinary clinic, and phone number.
  • A Name and number of your local emergency vet hospital.
  • A Names and numbers of specialty clinics you have visited.
  • A Vaccination history and an up-to-date rabies certificate.
  • A Results from physical exams.
  • A Medications and their dosages.
  • A Major illnesses and surgeries, plus dates.
  • A Any test results, biopsies, etc.
  • A Any allergies, hypersensitivities, or adverse reactions, especially to anesthesia.
  • A Diet regime.
  • A Your pet’s insurance policy, if applicable.

In the case of an emergency your stress level will be lowered and valuable time and money will be saved when you have your pet’s vet records at your fingertips. Your pet’s health binder can assist you in keeping track of scheduling appointments and keeps important information in one place in case you move, change vets, travel or board your pet and need proof of vaccinations.

The future is in online vet records. Ask your vet if they offer this option but do not be disappointed if they do not. This is not yet common but be aware that the technology is out there. For example, the University of California, Davis, Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital has created its own web-based electronic medical record system to track … Read the rest

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