5 Reasons Why Adopting Pets Is Better

5 Reasons Why Adopting Pets Is Better

My wife and I got our first dog, Riley, in August of 2018 coming from a breeder. She is a full-blooded golden retriever and it is the very best dog on the globe. Now, this was before we knew the struggles of overpopulation in dog shelters around the country. After having Riley for a while, my wife and I became fans of Animal Planet and, after watching various shows about dogs, we thought we would adopt our second dog, Olive, a combination breed of lab and cocker spaniel. After seeing the love that Olive gives our way of life, we have decided to adopt from now on for many reasons.

1.Over population

I bet if you were to go to your local pet shelter, you would see that almost all of their kennels are stuffed with animals prepared to be adopted. You might even observe that some dogs have been there for months or even years.

2.Save lives

There are way too many dogs that might be put down because they have been in the shelter too long or the shelter won’t have the bedroom or resources.

3.Save money

By adopting, you will lay aside plenty of money. It is so less costly to consider than buy a pet. All the dogs will be spayed or neutered and vaccinated and there’s just a small adoption fee, usually between $50-100.

4.You get a healthy dog

There is the misconception that all dogs who are at shelters or humane societies are sick or are already abused for some reason. That is not the situation whatsoever. Most shelters care for each of the vaccinations and then any hospital treatment before they’re up for adoption. They often perform temperament tests to ascertain if your pet is acceptable before putting up for adoption.

5.You get exactly the same love

I do not care in case you have your dog that is certainly from a champion line or possibly a mixed breed through the shelter. All dogs will offer the same wish to their owners, assuming the property owner manages them. No dog on the market … Read the rest

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Adopting a Dog From a Shelter – A Few Considerations

Adopting a Dog From a Shelter - A Few Considerations

My family recently experienced the joys and frustrations involved with adopting a dog in the local humane society. Though the process concluded with the addition of “Dakota”, a beautiful Flat Coat Retriever, there have been bumps and detours on the way. The process also required a great deal of patience and willingness to compromise. Now that I think about our experiences, I provide the following tricks to those that may be thinking of adopting a creature using the humane society or other animal shelters.

There is certainly not as exciting as deciding to enhance your family if the addition is a touch person or a pet. If you have decided to look at the local pet shelter looking for children dog, congratulations on doing something positive for dogs or puppies that may not otherwise get the opportunity to experience home. Though it seems safer to obtain a puppy from the breeder or to purchase one free from the friend, there’s something form of rewarding with regards to a shelter adoption. Yet whilst still being, before you go and pick-up Fido, please take into account the following lessons learned from my family’s experience.

Know what you’re looking for, and do not waiver on “critical” elements.

Simply stated, it is advisable to understand what kind of dog you’re searching for before to the animal shelter. This involves some soul-searching, as they say, with an honest assessment in the needs and wishes of your household and yourself. You also must consider your thoughts, personal preference, housing situation, and budget among other things. It is also a good idea to come to an over-all consensus with the ones that will probably be most directly associated with the dog. If you want a big dog and your partner wants a smaller dog, which will acquire a wish?

It can be important to prioritize your dog wish list. Decide what traits you need in a dog, what traits are negotiable, and which traits are of little importance. In my case, I knew I needed a dog having a relatively “low-key” temperament. Our home will become quite … Read the rest

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