Do All Dog Breeds Need the Same Amount of Exercise?

All breeds of dogs do need some exercise to be healthy. Without physical exercise canines cannot have strong bones and muscles. They would not have as much energy either. But do all breeds require the same amount of exercise each day? The answer is simply no.

There are some breeds that only need a moderate amount of physical activity to be healthy and happy. Others need quite a bit of activity though. So choose a breed based on your lifestyle.

If you come a go a lot to where a dog would have to be cooped up in the house for long periods of time, do not get a highly active breed. Same goes for if you live in apartments where the dog would have limited space to roam. The active breeds do better when they can have a good outdoor space to run in and that their owners are home enough to allow it.

Now there are other breeds that only need moderate exercise or room to run. These are ideal for the households where the dog is left alone in a house for periods of time or have a limited area to roam in. How do you know which breeds are what though? Let’s look into this question to see the answer.

Dog Breeds that Need Moderate Exercise

The list below shows some breeds and their characteristics that only have a moderate need for exercise:

Bichon Frise – This breed likes to be walked once a day and some play. It is not hard to give this breed its needed exercise.

Chihuahua – Even these dogs are small enough to be carried easily they still need a walk every day. Playing is fine too, to provide their exercise.

Pug – This loves to go on a walk but loves to try to lead the way. The owner should make the dog walk even with him instead of ahead of him.

The list below is a sample of the breeds that need a lot of exercise to be happy and healthy.

Border Collie – This is a … Read the rest

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Pets and Divorce – How to Keep Fifi and Fido in the Family

Here’s some statistical food for thought: according to the American Pet Products Association (APPA) 2009/2010 National Pet Owners Survey, 62 percent of U.S. households own a pet. In its pet ownership breakdown, the APPA reports that American households include 77.5 million dogs, 93.6 million cats, 13.3 million horses and 15 million birds. Clearly, a lot of pets are living with families that will experience divorce.

How does divorce law deal with pets? By law, property acquired during marriage is presumed to be community property. If one spouse proves that a pet was acquired before the marriage, for example, it is considered separate property and the community property presumption is overcome.

In a divorce or legal separation, community property must be divided, resulting in the property settlement. When the pet is community property, the animal’s best interest doesn’t apply, at least not directly. But that is changing.

Earlier this summer in Maryland, Judge Graydon S. McKee III made national news when he ruled that divorcing spouses Gale and Craig Myers would share custody of “Lucky,” their adopted Lhasa Apso. Lucky will spend six months with Gale and six months with Craig. As neither party objected to the judge’s novel decision, it is final. As McKee noted, “It was very clear that both of them love this dog  only fair thing to do was to give each one an equal chance to share in the love of the dog.” Love of the dog? Now that is something novel in the law!

The more time spent debating the future of a family’s furry or feathered companion, the more rancorous a divorce can become. So, if a prenuptial agreement is in the works in contemplation of marriage, consider designing your pet’s future in advance. And if a divorce is imminent or pending, consider divorce mediation. With mediation, a couple has a less formal forum where they may fully express their views, concerns, needs, goals and even pet matters.

With community property pet issues, the neutral mediator outlines points of agreement and points of contention. Some of the facts that will be taken … Read the rest

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